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Posts Tagged ‘sleep patterns’

Sleepy Drivers Use the Wrong Tactics to Stay Awake

August 21st, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

DME automotive recently surveyed American drivers on the top ways they try to combat sleepiness on the road, and it turns out that drivers are getting it all wrong.

Recent articles document the results of the survey which predictably found drinking caffeinated beverages at the top of the list for staying awake. This tactic, along with opening windows, pulling over and exercising/stretching, and blasting loud music and air conditioning realistically have very short-term to no effect.

Instead, safety experts recommend pulling over and taking a nap. “Pulling over and napping (only 23 percent reporting) ranked a lowly 7(th), on a par with eating or singing (21 percent),” writes Canadian Automotive Review. “The findings indicate most drivers are doing things to fight sleepiness at the wheel that don’t work, and it’s likely contributing to the scary statistics: drowsy driving is responsible for somewhere between 15-33 percent of all fatal crashes,(1) or more than 100,000 accidents each year.”

“This survey reveals a big problem: when people get sleepy on the road, too many take measures that simply don’t work. Most of us do ineffective things like stopping for that third triple-shot cappuccino or slapping water on our face just to keep going. As drivers, we need to heed our drowsiness: and stop and sleep, or let a rested person drive,” said Mary Sheridan, director of Research and Analytics for DME automotive.

Source: Purchasing B2B/From Sleep Diagnosis and Therapy

Poor Coping Mechanisms a Mediating Pathway Between Stress Exposure and Insomnia

August 1st, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments
Published on July 3, 2014

A new study identifies specific coping behaviors through which stress exposure leads to the development of insomnia.

Results show that coping with a stressful event through behavioral disengagement—giving up on dealing with the stress—or by using alcohol or drugs each significantly mediated the relationship between stress exposure and insomnia development. Surprisingly, the coping technique of self-distraction—such as going to the movies or watching TV–also was a significant mediator between stress and incident insomnia. Furthermore, the study found that cognitive intrusion—recurrent thoughts about the stressor—was a significant and key mediator, accounting for 69% of the total effect of stress exposure on insomnia.

“Our study is among the first to show that it’s not the number of stressors, but your reaction to them that determines the likelihood of experiencing insomnia,” says lead author Vivek Pillai, PhD, research fellow at the Sleep Disorders & Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, in a release. “While a stressful event can lead to a bad night of sleep, it’s what you do in response to stress that can be the difference between a few bad nights and chronic insomnia.”

Study results are published in the July 1 issue of the journal Sleep.

The study involved a community-based sample of 2,892 good sleepers with no lifetime history of insomnia. At baseline, the participants reported the number of stressful life events that they had experienced in the past year, such as a divorce, serious illness, major financial problem, or the death of a spouse. They also reported the perceived severity and duration of each stressful event. Questionnaires also measured levels of cognitive intrusion and identified coping strategies in which participants engaged in the 7 days following the stressful event. A follow-up assessment after 1 year identified participants with insomnia disorder, which was defined as having symptoms of insomnia occurring at least 3 nights per week for a duration of 1 month or longer with associated daytime impairment or distress.

“This study is an important reminder that stressful events and other major life changes often cause insomnia,” says American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) president Dr Timothy Morgenthaler. “If you are feeling overwhelmed by events in your life, talk to your doctor about strategies to reduce your stress level and improve your sleep.”

According to the authors, the study identified potential targets for therapeutic interventions to improve coping responses to stress and reduce the risk of insomnia. In particular, they noted that mindfulness-based therapies have shown considerable promise in suppressing cognitive intrusion and improving sleep.

“Though we may not be able to control external events, we can reduce their burden by staying away from certain maladaptive behaviors,” Pillai says.

The AASM reports that short-term insomnia disorder lasting less than 3 months occurs in 15% to 20% of adults and is more prevalent in women than in men.

- See more at: http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2014/07/stress-exposure-coping-insomnia/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=SR+Sleep+Report+7%2F09&spMailingID=8979349&spUserID=MjQxMTIxNTA4MjUS1&spJobID=340679522&spReportId=MzQwNjc5NTIyS0#sthash.lVQ3rxG0.dpuf

Five Ways To Sleep Outside Without A Tent

July 22nd, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

http://indefinitelywild.gizmodo.com/five-ways-to-sleep-outside-without-a-tent-1598690786

Great article for all the campers out there and it is summer-enjoy!

In Elderly, Less Sleep Linked to Aging Brain

July 11th, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore have found evidence that the less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age. These findings, relevant in the context of Singapore’s rapidly aging society, pave the way for future work on sleep loss and its contribution to cognitive decline, including dementia.

Past research has examined the impact of sleep duration on cognitive functions in older adults. Though faster brain ventricle enlargement is a marker for cognitive decline and the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, the effects of sleep on this marker have never been measured.

The Duke-NUS study examined the data of 66 older Chinese adults, from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study. Participants underwent structural MRI brain scans measuring brain volume and neuropsychological assessments testing cognitive function every 2 years. Additionally, their sleep duration was recorded through a questionnaire. Those who slept fewer hours showed evidence of faster ventricle enlargement and decline in cognitive performance.

“Our findings relate short sleep to a marker of brain aging,” says Dr June Lo, lead author and a Duke-NUS Research Fellow, in a release. “Work done elsewhere suggests that seven hours a day for adults seems to be the sweet spot for optimal performance on computer based cognitive tests. In coming years we hope to determine what’s good for cardio-metabolic and long term brain health too,” adds Professor Michael Chee, senior author and Director of the Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke-NUS.

The study was published in the journal SLEEP

- See more at: http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2014/07/old-less-sleep-aging-brain/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=SR+Sleep+Report+7%2F09&spMailingID=8979349&spUserID=MjQxMTIxNTA4MjUS1&spJobID=340679522&spReportId=MzQwNjc5NTIyS0#sthash.DcXOgPRa.dpuf

REM Sleep Disturbance May Signal Future Parkinson’s or Dementia

July 2nd, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

REM behavior disorder could be a sign of impending neurodegenerative disease, including Parkinson’s and dementia, according to new research at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2014 Annual Meeting.

Researchers are not sure why spontaneous and unexplained disturbance in REM sleep should lead to a neurodegenerative disease like Parkinson’s, but new longitudinal imaging data show a clear correlation between idiopathic REM behavior disorder and dysfunction of the dopamine transporter system involved in a wide range of vital brain functions, including memory and motor control. Dysfunction associated with dopamine in the brain marks the first hints of Parkinson’s disease.

In order to gauge the relationship between the REM sleep disorder and neurodegeneration, scientists performed molecular neuroimaging using a technique called single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which allows clinicians to evaluate bodily functions instead of focusing on structure, the forte of conventional radiology.

“Our SPECT study showed a trend toward decreased dopamine transporter density in the brain and Parkinsonism in the follow-up data of patients with REM sleep disorder who had no previous evidence of neurodegenerative disease,” said Hongyoon Choi, MD, a researcher at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam, Korea. “To our knowledge, a study looking at a long-term link between the two has never been conducted before.”

A total of 21 consecutive patients with no known Parkinsonism or cognitive decline were enrolled in the long-term study between 2004 and 2006 and were followed after about 8 years. A baseline SPECT scan of dopamine transporter function was performed with the radiopharmaceutical I-123 FP-CIT as an imaging agent. A follow-up scan was performed to assess progression of neurodegenerative disease. Results showed that after follow-up, patients’ SPECT scans revealed substantial decreases in radiotracer binding to the dopamine transport system in the nigrostriatal regions of the brain. A lack of tracer binding in these regions of the brain is closely linked to neuronal degeneration and the development of dementia and movement disorders.

A total of 10 patients out of the original 21 patients with disturbed REM sleep were found to have decreased striatal tracer binding at the beginning of the study. Of these, seven had developed neurodegenerative disease by follow-up some years later, including four patients who developed Parkinson’s disease and two patients who developed dementia with Lewy bodies, a neurodegenerative disease identified by the build-up of proteins, called Lewy bodies, in brain regions associated with memory muscle control.

- See more at: http://www.rtmagazine.com/2014/06/rem-sleep-disturbance-future-parkinsons-dementia/#sthash.PQJm2EyR.dpuf

Is it ADHD, or does your child have Sleep Apnea?

May 21st, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

A thoughtful question posed by a doctor at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. Many of the symptoms are similar and the two illnesses are often confused.

“Not much is understood by parents about snoring or sleep apnea, especially in their children. The Stanford School of Medicine states that about 10% of children 10 years of age and younger snore and, of those children who snore, about 20% will haveobstructive sleep apnea.
Snoring can be a sign that your child has sleep apnea as it indicates, at the very least, that their airway is partially obstructed during sleep. Sleep apnea is a serious medical condition that can interrupt or stop your child’s breathing, prevent a normal night’s sleep, impair growth, and lead to a lower quality of life. It also can cause serious fatigue during the day which is why it is so often confused with ADHD.
Sleep-disordered breathing such as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have long been associated with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). You should know that not every child diagnosed with sleep apnea has ADHD, just as not every child diagnosed with ADHD has sleep apnea. However, many studies have been performed indicating a significant correlation between OSA and behavioral issues. Children with obstructive sleep apnea do not get restful sleep, and as a result may complain of morning headaches, be irritable and have difficulty concentrating.
Children with sleep apnea may complain of being tired during the day and, at the same time, exhibit hyperactive behavior or act impulsively. Herein lays the confusion of separating sleep apnea from ADHD because many of the classic symptoms of ADHD are often exhibited in children with OSA. So, as a parent of a child diagnosed with ADHD, what do you do?”

5-7-14 adhd“It will be in your child’s best interest if you dig a little deeper into the root of what may be causing these behaviors. Watch your child sleep at night – and even record it if you can. Check for restlessness, mouth breathing, snoring, or breathing pauses. If they occur, have your child evaluated for possible sleep apnea to ensure the proper diagnosis and treatment.
Figuring out if your child has sleep apnea or ADHD may seem quite complex but it doesn’t have to be. Consult with a sleep apnea doctor if you can answer ‘yes’ to any or some of the following questions:
- Does your child snore?
- Does your child stop breathing for a few seconds at night?
- Does your child frequently mouth breathe?
- Does your child sleep through the night or is it a restless sleep?
- Is there frequent bedwetting?
- Does your child seem irritable during the day? Is there difficulty focusing? Are there periods of hyperactivity?”

7-14-1`2 teacher and sleeper“The good news is that sleep apnea is treatable. Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are the most common causes of sleep apnea in children. An Ear, Nose and Throat specialist can determine if your child’s tonsils and adenoids are enlarged and possibly blocking the airway at night. A tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can successfully treat sleep apnea by removing the obstruction in the airway resulting in a complete elimination of symptoms in 80-90% of children.”

Dr. Lana B. Patitucci, D.O. is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. She is trained in all aspects of general and pediatric otolaryngology including endoscopic sinus, otologic, head and neck, and facial plastic surgery.

Sleep Doctor is Guru of Slumber for Professional Sports Teams

May 20th, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

More practice or more sleep? Most sports teams know intuitively that sleep is essential, and they enforce the notion with strict curfews.

The idea that sleep can add up to a real advantage in high-stakes sports can be seen in the high respect given to Harvard sleep specialist Charles Czeisler. According to a lengthy story in the Atlantic by Danielle Elliot, Dr. Czeisler gets frequent calls from NHL and NBA coaches asking for advice.

According to Elliot, Czeisler is a tenured professor at Harvard Medical School and a go-to expert for professional sports teams from every major league. “In the age of analytics-as-religion, teams are looking for every possible way to squeeze more skill out of elite athletes,” writes Elliot. “They consult experts on everything from the number of minutes a player should be on the court to how many fourth down conversions they should attempt. But Czeisler recommends something much simpler: more sleep.”

As director of the Division Sleep Medicine at Harvard, Czeisler is known around the NBA as the Sleep Doctor. “Jovial, he presents most of the research with a slight laugh, as if to say none of this should come as a surprise,” writes Elliot. “It’s sleep. And yet, it’s so poorly understood. Beyond sports, he’s also consulted with NASA and the Secret Service.”

Source: The Atlantic

Can Naps be Harmful?

May 13th, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

By Lori Sichtermann

It’s well documented that taking the occasional mid-day nap can have a positive effect on one’s health.  A brief power nap can reduce sleepiness, improve cognitive functioning such as problem solving and decision making, and improve one’s reaction time. An afternoon snooze also can enhance short-term memory and mood, Dr Nicole Lovato, nap scientist at the School of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, told NapNow.net.au.

Yet, as refreshing as a siesta may seem, recent results from a 13-year study conducted by researchers at the University of Cambridge reveal that those who napped more than an hour or more each day  were 32% more susceptible to early death.

After analyzing the health and outcome of nappers and non-nappers, investigators found the frequent nappers –  those who napped for more than two hours every day  –  had a greater risk of death by heart disease, cancer, and respiratory illness.

Because the results of these findings remained the same even after the researchers adjusted for age, sex, educational level, body mass index, physical activity level, smoking, alcohol intake, and other preexisting conditions, investigators with the study believe the results demonstrate a link between chronic napping and undiagnosed health problems. In fact, a growing tome of research has reported associations between napping and increased risk of several medical problems, including type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol.

According to Lovato, who was not involved in the study, many individuals with co-existing medical and sleep problems, such as diabetes and sleep apnea, also experience excessive levels of daytime sleepiness. As a result, she says, the connection between extensive naps and chronic disease is likely due to medical issues that contribute to daytime sleepiness, which is in turn relieved by napping. She specifically notes diabetes as a disease that induces tiredness, which may encourage napping.

Although there is evidence that links chronic napping to more serious health issues, Lavato is quick to say that more research is needed. She notes that the majority of these types of studies are cross-sectional in nature, so they are not designed to establish whether napping can actually cause medical problems.

“Experimental and prospective studies are needed to assess the casual direction between medical issues and napping,” she told NapNow.net.au. “Essentially, is napping causing the health problem or is the health problem causing napping?”

According to a report on the topic published by Health.com, not all naps are bad or indicate poor health. In fact, a number of previous studies have found that naps can actually help with certain medical conditions, such as depression, anxiety, and even lower blood pressure. James Wyatt, PhD, director of the Sleep Disorders Service and Research Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, told Health.com that those who suffer from narcolepsy or shift-work syndrome can actually benefit greatly from regular daytime naps.

Experts on the topic of naps say 30 to 45 minutes is best when it comes to catching some mid-day Zs. However, individuals are well-advised to listen to their bodies. If one is consistently feeling tired and in need of frequent naps, it may be a good idea to seek medical attention.

- See more at: http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2014/05/naps-harmful/#sthash.bUf8n7fg.dpuf

Review of OSA Therapy Options for Pediatric Patients

May 2nd, 2014 Raquel Rothe No comments

April 11, 2014
by 

Sleep apnea is difficult for anyone to live with, but it is especially challenge for a young child. As a parent, it can also be quite frightening and stressful. If you have noticed that your child has sleep apnea, Take them to a physician and start treatment as soon as possible. Following are some treatment options for children with sleep apnea.

Surgery is often an option for children with severe sleep apnea.  These surgeries are to remove the tonsils or the adenoids.The surgery typically has a success rate of about 80 50 percent. In some cases, the tonsils or adenoids can actually grow back, increasing the chances of sleep apnea re-developing. Regular followup is a must for patients with sleep apnea.

Another option to consider is getting your child a CPAP to use at night. CPAP stands for a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.  Your child would need to wear a mask which is attached to a blower that will continuously blow air into your child’s nose throughout the night while he or she is sleeping. These devices are shown to maintain normal breathing patterns and keep your child safe.

Dentistry does not have a treatment modality that includes treatment for pediatric OSA with classic sleep appliances.  This is due to the quick arch and dentition changes.  Dental treatment comes in to form of orthodontic treatment that includes maxillary expansion and advancement of the mandible.  These 2 modalities require much further elaboration.  This is not the venue.

Snoring and CPAP Intolerance: Dr. Keropian is the inventor and patent holder of the Full Breath Solution sleep appliance. He has attained 5 FDA Certification and 5 Patents. Presently he has two patents pending. He the CEO of Full Breath Corporation.

He can be reached at 818-702-6002 or via email at fullbreathsolution@hotmail.com or tmjrelief@msn.com. You can also check out his website: cpapalternative.com

Sleep Apnea Can Worsen Blood Sugar Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes

April 2nd, 2014 Raquel Rothe 1 comment

Researchers at the University of Chicago found that sleep apnea can worsen blood sugar control in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The findings provide another good reason for people with sleep apnea to wear a CPAP mask that helps assure uninterrupted breathing, the standard treatment for the condition, throughout the night. It is well known that sleep apnea, which causes breathing pauses and dangerous drops in oxygen during sleep, sharply raises the risk of Type 2 diabetes. More severe cases of sleep apnea are generally associated with poorer blood sugar control in diabetics

As originally reported on the American Diabetes Association web site (and published in Diabetes Care), disruption during the REM phase of sleep had the most detrimental effects on long-term blood sugar control. The problem, says Dr. Babak Mokhlesi, an author of the study “Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep with Reduced Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: Therapeutic Implications”, is that most REM sleep occurs in the early morning hours before waking, at a time when many patients remove their CPAP mask.

“In type 2 diabetes, OSA during REM sleep may influence long-term glycemic control,” writes Mokhlesi, director of the sleep disorders center at the University of Chicago, in the study’s abstract. “The metabolic benefits of CPAP therapy may not be achieved with the typical adherence of 4 h per night.”

http://www.sleepdt.com/sleep-apnea-can-worsen-blood-sugar-control-in-people-with-type-2-diabetes/