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Posts Tagged ‘CPAP’

Sleep Apnea Can Worsen Blood Sugar Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes

April 2nd, 2014 Raquel Rothe

Researchers at the University of Chicago found that sleep apnea can worsen blood sugar control in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The findings provide another good reason for people with sleep apnea to wear a CPAP mask that helps assure uninterrupted breathing, the standard treatment for the condition, throughout the night. It is well known that sleep apnea, which causes breathing pauses and dangerous drops in oxygen during sleep, sharply raises the risk of Type 2 diabetes. More severe cases of sleep apnea are generally associated with poorer blood sugar control in diabetics

As originally reported on the American Diabetes Association web site (and published in Diabetes Care), disruption during the REM phase of sleep had the most detrimental effects on long-term blood sugar control. The problem, says Dr. Babak Mokhlesi, an author of the study “Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep with Reduced Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: Therapeutic Implications”, is that most REM sleep occurs in the early morning hours before waking, at a time when many patients remove their CPAP mask.

“In type 2 diabetes, OSA during REM sleep may influence long-term glycemic control,” writes Mokhlesi, director of the sleep disorders center at the University of Chicago, in the study’s abstract. “The metabolic benefits of CPAP therapy may not be achieved with the typical adherence of 4 h per night.”

http://www.sleepdt.com/sleep-apnea-can-worsen-blood-sugar-control-in-people-with-type-2-diabetes/

Sleep apnea may hold hidden dangers for women

March 12th, 2014 Raquel Rothe

Sleep apnea may hold hidden dangers for women

Monday 28 October 2013 – 3am PST

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Sleep apnea may hold hidden dangers for women

A new study on sleep apnea reveals there could be some hidden dangers – particularly for women who have the condition – where breathing is interrupted during sleep. Women with sleep apnea may appear healthy, but they have subtle symptoms so their sleep problem is often misdiagnosed.

Now, new research, led by the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Nursing, shows that the body’s autonomic responses, which normally control blood pressure, heart rate, sweating and other basic functions, are not as strong in people with obstructive sleep apnea, and even less so in women.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a serious condition that happens when the person is asleep, sometimes hundreds of times a night. When it occurs, blood oxygen drops and eventually damages many cells of the body.

There are over 20 million adult Americans living with the condition, note the researchers, who explain that it is linked with several serious health problems and also early death.

Women are much less likely to be diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea than men.

Lead researcher Dr. Paul Macey says:

“We now know that sleep apnea is a precursor to bigger health issues. And for women in particular, the results could be deadly.”

Early detection and intervention needed

Dr. Macey and his colleagues describe their work in a recent online issue of PLOS ONE.

For their study, the team recruited 94 adult men and women, comprising 37 newly diagnosed, untreated obstructive sleep (OSA) patients and 57 healthy volunteers to act as controls.

The three groups had their heart rates measured as they went through three different physical challenges:

  • The Valsalva maneuver – where they had to breathe out hard while keeping the mouth closed
  • A hand-grip challenge – where they had to just squeeze hard with one hand
  • A cold pressor challenge – where the right foot is inserted into near-freezing water for a minute.

The team notes the main results:

“Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in females.”

Dr. Macey adds:

“This may mean that women are more likely to develop symptoms of heart disease, as well as other consequences of poor adaptation to daily physical tasks. Early detection and treatment may be needed to protect against damage to the brain and other organs.”

The team now intends to investigate if the usual treatments for OSA, such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), help to improve the autonomic responses.

CPAP is where a machine helps the OSA patient breathe more easily while asleep.

Funds from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Nursing Research helped finance the study.

In another study published recently, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA, found that sleep apnea is linked to early sign of heart failure.

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Sleep apnea may hold hidden dangers for women

November 5th, 2013 Raquel Rothe

A new study on sleep apnea reveals there could be some hidden dangers – particularly for women who have the condition – where breathing is interrupted during sleep. Women with sleep apnea may appear healthy, but they have subtle symptoms so their sleep problem is often misdiagnosed.

Now, new research, led by the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Nursing, shows that the body’s autonomic responses, which normally control blood pressure, heart rate, sweating and other basic functions, are not as strong in people with obstructive sleep apnea, and even less so in women.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a serious condition that happens when the person is asleep, sometimes hundreds of times a night. When it occurs, blood oxygen drops and eventually damages many cells of the body.

There are over 20 million adult Americans living with the condition, note the researchers, who explain that it is linked with several serious health problems and also early death.

Women are much less likely to be diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea than men.

Lead researcher Dr. Paul Macey says:

“We now know that sleep apnea is a precursor to bigger health issues. And for women in particular, the results could be deadly.”

Early detection and intervention needed

Dr. Macey and his colleagues describe their work in a recent online issue of PLOS ONE.

For their study, the team recruited 94 adult men and women, comprising 37 newly diagnosed, untreated obstructive sleep (OSA) patients and 57 healthy volunteers to act as controls.

The three groups had their heart rates measured as they went through three different physical challenges:

  • The Valsalva maneuver – where they had to breathe out hard while keeping the mouth closed
  • A hand-grip challenge – where they had to just squeeze hard with one hand
  • A cold pressor challenge – where the right foot is inserted into near-freezing water for a minute.

The team notes the main results:

“Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in females.”

Dr. Macey adds:

“This may mean that women are more likely to develop symptoms of heart disease, as well as other consequences of poor adaptation to daily physical tasks. Early detection and treatment may be needed to protect against damage to the brain and other organs.”

The team now intends to investigate if the usual treatments for OSA, such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), help to improve the autonomic responses.

CPAP is where a machine helps the OSA patient breathe more easily while asleep.

Funds from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Nursing Research helped finance the study.

In another study published recently, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA, found that sleep apnea is linked to early sign of heart failure.

Written by Catharine Paddock PhD

Alcohol’s Effect on Nighttime Breathing

April 26th, 2013 Raquel Rothe

Alcohol’s Effect on Nighttime Breathing

In general, alcohol is a substance that may have significant impacts on your health. You may not have realized that it may also affect your sleep, especially if you have sleep-disordered breathing, such as sleep apnea.

Alcohol can decrease your drive to breathe, slowing your breathing and making your breaths shallow. In addition, it may relax the muscles of your throat, which may make it more likely for your upper airway to collapse.

The Consequences of Alcohol in Sleep Apnea

As the result of alcohol use, apnea events occur more frequently in someone who is predisposed to them. In addition, the drops in the oxygen levels of the blood (called desaturations) become more severe. This may lead to increased carbon dioxide levels in the body, a condition called hypercapnia. Therefore, the consequences of sleep apnea may become more pronounced with alcohol use.

If You Have Sleep Apnea, Should You Avoid Alcohol?

If you have sleep apnea, the best advice would be to abstain from all alcohol use. At the very least, alcohol should not be used in the several hours prior to bedtime to minimize the effects overnight.

You should also keep in mind that it is important to set up your continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) under typical sleeping conditions. Therefore, if you drink alcohol daily but abstain prior to your titration study, the pressure may not be adequate to maintain your airway when you drink. If you wish to maximize your therapy, consider the role that alcohol use plays in treating your sleep apnea.

American Academy of Sleep Medicine Statement on the Use of Provigil

August 15th, 2012 Raquel Rothe

American Academy of Sleep Medicine Statement on the Use of Provigil



American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Thursday, July 19, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Thomas Heffron, 630-737-9700, ext. 9327 – theffron@aasmnet.org

DARIEN, IL – July 19, 2012 – A segment on the newsmagazine show Nightline reported people taking the prescription medication Provigil as a “smart drug,” to maintain wakefulness and promote cognitive enhancement.  The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) emphasizes that Provigil should be used only under the supervision of a doctor for the treatment of excessive sleepiness caused by narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea or shift work disorder.  Provigil is a schedule IV controlled substance that carries risk for abuse and dependence.

Provigil, which comprises the drug modafinil, is a stimulant that originally received FDA approval in 1998.  A variation of the medication, marketed as Nuvigil and composed of armodafinil, was approved by the FDA in 2007.

Both drugs are approved only for the treatment of three sleep disorders that compromise daytime alertness.  Provigil should not be prescribed off-label or purchased independently by consumers for cognitive or performance enhancement. There is little evidence to support the use of Provigil or any other drug to improve learning and memory, and no medication provides such benefits without side effects.

Potential side effects from taking Provigil include headache, upset stomach and dizziness.  Although much less common, more serious side effects may occur, including severe rash or allergic reaction affecting the liver or blood cells.

It is important for patients to take Provigil under the supervision of a licensed physician who knows their medical history and has record of other medications that they are taking.

According to the AASM, getting a sufficient amount of nightly sleep is the safest and healthiest way to promote optimal mental and physical performance during the day.  Although individual sleep needs vary, most adults need about seven to eight hours of nightly sleep to feel alert and well-rested during the day.

About Provigil and Sleep Disorders

Provigil is approved by the FDA for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness related to narcolepsy, shift work disorder and obstructive sleep apnea.  Narcolepsy is a form of hypersomnia that commonly involves the sudden onset of irresistible sleep, and shift work sleep disorder is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder that occurs due to a work schedule that takes place during the normal sleep period.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep-related breathing disorder that involves repeated breathing pauses during sleep; these disruptions impair sleep quality and promote daytime sleepiness.  The primary treatment for OSA is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, which restores normal breathing during sleep.  Provigil is not a replacement for CPAP or any other treatment prescribed for OSA.

About the AASM

The AASM is a professional membership society that is the leader in setting standards and promoting excellence in sleep medicine health care, education and research (www.aasmnet.org).

NFL’s #1 Draft Pick Claims Sleep Apnea Slowed Him Down

November 13th, 2011 Raquel Rothe

NFL’s #1 Draft Pick Claims Sleep Apnea Slowed Him Down

Sleep apnea weaved its way into the national consciousness back in 2004 when legendary NFL lineman Reggie White died in his sleep at the age of 43. The NFL-apnea connection appeared yet again in a late October 2011 article in Sports Illustrated that documented the rise and dramatic fall of the Oakland Raiders’ #1 overall pick in the 2007 draft.

Many NFL fans remember JaMarcus Russell, a 6-foot, 7-inch quarterback with a rocket arm who flamed out of the league, a victim of a questionable work ethic that may have been made worse by sleep apnea.

Russell reports that the condition contributed to lethargic practices and less-than-alert film sessions. “In the NFL, my first year, I had to be there at 6:30 before practice and be on the treadmill for an hour,” said Russell in the article by L. Jon Wertheim. “Then meetings come, I sit down, eat my fruit. We watch film, and maybe I got tired. Coach Flip [quarterback coach John DeFilippo] pulled me aside and said, ‘What are you doing for night life?’ I said, ‘Coach, I’m just chilling.’ He said, ‘I need to get you checked out.’ I did the sleep test, and they said I had apnea.”

At another point in the article, Russell’s former “life coach,” ex NBA player John Lucas, said: “JaMarcus is a good kid, I’m telling you, who just needs to find his motivation. But we still talk. Have him tell you about his sleep apnea. A lot [of his issues] come from that. And no one knows it.” The article does not mention CPAP, oral appliances, compliance, or whether Russell underwent any therapy for the condition.

Almost 7 years after her husband’s death, Reggie White’s widow went on television this week to spread the word about sleep apnea. Last week, former San Diego Chargers’ offensive lineman Aaron Taylor, along with Rolf Benirschke, a kicker for the Chargers, attended yet another media event to talk about their own battles with sleep apnea.

link to the Benirschke article.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/nov/02/unmasking-the-problem-football-players-at-risk/

link to the Sports Illustrated article

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1191566/1/index.htm

5 Ways to Live With Your CPAP Machine Adjusting to CPAP can help people with sleep apnea sleep better. Here’s how to do it.

May 2nd, 2011 Raquel Rothe

Focus on the health benefits of your CPAP.   Adjusting to CPAP can make your sleep — and life – better, especially if you have severe sleep apnea. Read on to get sleep specialists’ top five tips on how you can make peace with the device.

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-apnea/features/cpap-machine?ecd=wnl_slw_021011

Sex and sleep-Sexsomnia

February 12th, 2011 admin

ADVANCE Perspective: SLEEP

Published June 24, 2010 12:33 PM by Vern Enge

In your sleep lab on a daily basis, you are probably most comfortable detecting obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, and parasomnias like sleepwalking and sleep eating.
You are an expert at titrating CPAP equipment to make sure your patients can get a good night’s sleep.

But how comfortable are you at discussing embarrassing topics like sleep sex, a.k.a. sexsomnia? This is a sleep disorder possibly more common than one might expect. One study earlier this year found 7.6 percent of 832 respondents in one sleep clinic survey admitted they had initiated sexual activity with a partner while asleep and had no recollection of it. They discovered their involuntary actions only when told by their bed partners.

Three of four people self-reporting sleep sex are males, according to health reporter Jenifer Goodwin.

Having sex while asleep is listed as a common complaint of patients

You know you’re a hosehead if…..

December 1st, 2010 Raquel Rothe

TracyCA Categories-views 104 views Categories-time September 16, 2009 at 3:14 pm posted on Sleep Connect

Categories-bubble By 

Tracy

As a self-proclaimed “hosehead,” I have found that humor has helped me through a lot of tough times and long nights with obstructive sleep apnea.

When faced with difficult health challenges, sometimes we forget to laugh and smile. I share these quips from my personal experiences. Hopefully you will enjoy a good laugh :)

You know you’re a hosehead if…

1. Your kids want to take you, CPAP and mask to school for show and tell.

2. Your bed partner always sleeps facing away from you and the mask exhalation ports.

3. You loudly snort awake, drooling, on an airplane and find passengers staring at you in amazement.

4. You feel like a dog on a leash and must sleep on the very edge of the bed to be able to roll over just once without pulling CPAP off the nightstand.

5. When out and about in the morning hours, you recognize mask strap marks on the faces of other people and know it’s not rosacea.

6. You feel like a goldfish when your primary-care physician calls in all his partners to peer into your mouth to look at your tongue base and uvula – even though you only went in for a preventive flu shot.

7. Your supportive spouse changes your CPAP filter on the same rotation as your furnace filter.

8. Ocean is no longer a vacation dream spot, but the saline solution you keep on your nightstand.

9. “Aerophagia” (also known as PAP gas) takes on new meaning when you have a dream that Guinness World Records contacts you to validate your ability to pass gas on demand – longer, louder and more frequently than anyone else on the whole planet.

10. You catch your kids and their friends in your bedroom with your CPAP turned on, wearing your mask and pretending to be Darth Vader.

11. You no longer read a book at the airport while waiting to board your plane, but scout out and count CPAP bags instead.

12. Your new favorite song is “You’re Still the One” because that’s how you feel about your CPAP machine.

Good Sleep!
Tracy

What is obstructive sleep apnea?

September 12th, 2010 Raquel Rothe

So you never have energy and you are tired most days…..you may have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

OSA is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder that occurs during sleep, and that may lead to life-threatening conditions. The upper airway repeatedly collapses, causing cessation of breathing (apnea-air flow is blocked) or inadequate breathing (hypopnea) and sleep fragmentation. The sleep fragmentation results in chronic daytime sleepiness.

Identifications:

Are you sleepy during the day?
Do you have disruptive snoring at night?
Do you have pauses in breathing during the night?
Do you have pauses in breathing during the night?
Do you wake yourself up choking or gasping?
Obesity
Large neck (less than 17″-men, less than 16″-women)
Restless sleep
Diagnosis: If you have these signs and symptoms, they could be indicative of sleep apnea. Report these signs and symptoms to your healthcare professional as you may need to undergo a diagnostic sleep study. This test is painless and provides information about how a patient breathes during sleep. The data that is collected will enable the physician to determine the type and severity of sleep apnea, along with your treatment options.

Potential Consequences if OSA is left untreated: Now you know you have sleep apnea but not sure you want it treated? “I think I will be fine without wearing that mask. I’ve slept this way most of my life”.
Decreased quality of life
OSA patients, prior to diagnosis and treatment, consume 2 1/2 times more health care resources that patients without OSA
Hypertension (high blood pressure)
Cardiac arrhythmias (irregularities in heart rate/rhythm)
Stroke
Heart Attack
Diabetes
Increased risk of motor vehicle and work-related accidents due to sleepiness
Interventions could include Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) therapy, surgery, body position modification, oral appliances, lifestyle changes such as weight loss (if needed), good sleep hygiene, and avoidance of alcohol, sedatives and hypnotics. Your health depends on your intervention to improve your quality of life. At Sleep EZ, we provide a home-like environment that is relaxing so if you need to undergo diagnostic testing for sleep apnea your experience is more comfortable. Remember, it’s your insurance, it’s your choice where to be tested. Sleep EZ “Diagnostic excellence in a serene setting”