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UA Professor Engages Kids, Encourages Z’s

October 13th, 2015 Raquel Rothe
By Sydney Donaldson
,

UA College of Engineering
September 28, 2015
RESOURCES FOR THE MEDIA
Janet Meiling Roveda in the College of Engineering has designed MySleep for maximum precision and security.

Janet Meiling Roveda in the College of Engineering has designed MySleep for maximum precision and security.
UA professors Michelle Perfect and Janet Roveda (fifth and sixth from left) with student researchers Imelda Murrieta, Estrella Ochoa, Sara Frye, Paloma Colacion and Daniel Shammas.

UA professors Michelle Perfect and Janet Roveda (fifth and sixth from left) with student researchers Imelda Murrieta, Estrella Ochoa, Sara Frye, Paloma Colacion and Daniel Shammas.

More and more information is at our fingertips, thanks to engineers and computer scientists who translate enormous amounts of complex data from portable and wearable devices into language that users can easily understand.

But what if the user is a fourth-grader?

Janet Meiling Roveda, a University of Arizona associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, is addressing that question as co-principal investigator of the “Z-Factor,” officially called the Sleep Education Program to Improve STEM Education in Elementary School.

More than 500 fourth- and fifth-grade students in the Catalina Foothills School District are expected to participate in Z-Factor over the next three years, the largest-ever national study of elementary school students’ sleep habits and STEM learning.

The study involves creating a curriculum that uses the topic of sleep to develop students’ skills and interests in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. In the process, the program is expected to educate children and parents about sleep’s role in academic performance, perhaps encouraging more sleep in students’ routines.

“With this study, we’re trying to get kids engaged in STEM topics and rested enough to pursue them,” Roveda said.

Michelle Perfect, associate professor in the College of Education’s Department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies, is the lead investigator on the $1.2 million project funded by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers.

Secure Software Program

For the STEM-learning and sleep-monitoring parts of the study, Roveda has developed a Web-based software program called “MySleep,” which is highly encrypted and password-protected with secure algorithms built in.

“While most algorithms for research studies are nonlinear in complexity, our algorithms use high-speed linear encryption and secure data compression techniques that require users to compress and recover the data several times,” Roveda said. She developed the novel algorithms for Z-Factor with help from UA engineers Linda Powers and Wolfgang Fink, experts in designing large-scale biomedical research studies.

“With a study of this magnitude, especially one that involves the information of children, we want to make sure all information is secure,” Roveda said.

The software collects and analyzes thousands of gigabytes of data from activity monitors the children wear and converts the data into understandable and interesting content for students using the MySleep website.

The children will wear actigraphs — watch-like monitors that track hours of sleep, quality of sleep, restlessness and other factors — for multiple nights early in the study. At the end of the recording period, they will upload data from their monitors to tablets the district has purchased for the project. The data will be stored on a secure server.

When students enter their personal MySleep portals on the Internet — to which parents and teachers also have access — they will see avatars in their likenesses and caricatures of parents, teachers and friends. Colorful graphs will show students their sleep patterns, and planning charts will help them monitor daily activities.

Measuring Success

Students will design personal research projects based on data from their activity monitors. In the process, the students will learn about science and math and develop critical thinking and communication skills. They may even discover that a little more sleep can help them do better on a math quiz.

“Z-Factor is based on the premise that having students solve problems in real-world situations that are relevant to their daily lives can have a long-lasting positive impact on their interest in STEM and intention to pursue additional STEM courses and careers,” Roveda said.

Teachers will incorporate data from MySleep into their lessons on math, statistics, averages, probabilities and other subjects. Roveda and Perfect are developing the curriculum in collaboration with the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, a nonprofit science education organization.

“The work Janet is doing will help kids analyze their personal data in a developmentally appropriate way,” said Perfect, a licensed psychologist who has extensive experience working with young children and families. “By studying their own sleep data and using mobile technologies for personal data management, these elementary school students are on a real-world research frontier.”

As part of the project assessment, students in the Z-Factor study will take pre- and post-assessment tests developed by Biological Sciences Curriculum Study and selected by Perfect and other UA researchers to assess whether interest and skills in STEM topics have grown.

The Z-Factor team already is working to make the program more widely available, and members are planning to translate the MySleep content into Spanish and adapt the program to work efficiently with less costly sleep-tracking devices or only handwritten sleep diaries.

“We want this data-driven sleep research study and STEM curriculum to be accessible to every student in every school,” Roveda said.

How Often Should a Baby Feed at Night?

May 27th, 2015 Raquel Rothe

By: Brandon Peters, MD (Sleep Expert)

If you have a young baby, you might wonder: When can my sleep get back to normal?! As part of this, you may want to learn how often your baby should be feeding at night. Learn about weaning in the first 6 months of life, how you can minimize awakenings to eat in the night, and at what age those feedings should go away entirely.

First, each baby is different. Don’t try to force something to happen that may not be right for your child.

  • If more than 8 ounces of fluid are consumed overnight, it may be necessary to redistribute this intake to the daytime. This should occur gradually.

Another way to assess whether the feedings are needed is to pay attention to the number of diaper changes that occur. Most babies who are older than 3 months do not need to be changed at night. If the diapers are frequently soaked at night, this can be a sign of excessive fluid intake. A well-hydrated baby will urinate the extra fluid. Older children with bedwetting may experience this due to other reasons.

It is possible to gradually reduce the frequency and volume of feedings at night. Your child will learn to consume the needed fluid during the daytime and sleep soundly through the night. Adults don’t typically drink or eat during the night. Similarly, most babies beyond the age of 3 months shouldn’t either.

If you are concerned about your child’s need for feedings at night, or if you have difficulty weaning these nighttime feedings, speak with your pediatrician to obtain further guidance.

Source:

Ferber, R. “Solve Your Child’s Sleep Problems.” Simon & Schuster, The Fireside Edition, 2006.

Even smartphone screens impact kids’ sleep, study finds

February 26th, 2015 Raquel Rothe

Meghan Holohan


Jan. 5, 2015 at 2:44 AM ET

For tweens who got a tablet or smartphone for the holidays, their new bedtime routine may involve Netflix helping them doze off. But don’t think that’s better than watching TV before bed. A new study finds that even small-screen devices interrupt children’s sleep.

Experts have known that a flickering TV in the bedroom cuts into children’s sleep time. A researcher at the University of California, Berkeley wondered if small screens, such as those found on tablets and smartphones, influenced children’s sleep, too.

“Much less is known about new forms of media, like smartphones,” says Jennifer Falbe, lead author of the study, which appears in the journal Pediatrics. “[They] have the potential to impact sleep, perhaps to a greater degree than traditional media.”

Falbe studied results from the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration, where 2,048 fourth-and seventh-grade students answered questions about their sleep and TV, smartphone, and tablet habits.

What the new research found:

  • Children who dozed off near a small screen said they slept 20.6 minutes less than their peers who snoozed away from electronic devices.
  • More importantly, children attached to small screens complained of interrupted sleep, something that even those who watched loads of TV or slept with a TV in the room did not admit to feeling.
  • Those who were lulled to sleep by a TV admitted to 18 fewer minutes a sleep.
  • Children who spent a lot of time during the day watching TV or videos or playing videogames also reported sleeping less.

The study didn’t look at why small screens impact sleep, but Falbe says a few factors play a role.

“While any type of light can suppress melatonin release, blue light emitted from electronics has a stronger impact on melatonin release,” she says. “Content can be engaging and emotionally arousing.”

While children may treat tablets and smartphones like another appendage, experts say there are ways to stop them from migrating to the bedroom.

“[Smart phones and tablets] are robbing the kid of the nightly routine of how to go to bed and get to sleep,” says Michele Borba, a parenting expert and TODAY Parents contributor.

She believes children need to learn how to fall asleep without help from electronics and recommends that phones and tablets are worked into the nighttime routine. Children will soon know that they can’t use electronics a half hour before bed.

Parenting expert Dr. Deborah Gilboa takes it one step further: parents should keep all chargers in their bedrooms and tell their children they must “park” their devices in their rooms. The ping of a text will no longer cause a child to spring from bed to check a phone or tablet.

“Kids genuinely believe … communication is actually that urgent,” says Gilboa. “Every one of those messages feels impossible to ignore.”

http://www.today.com/parents

College and Sleep Should Be Two Peas in a Pod

September 3rd, 2014 Raquel Rothe

Our new college bedding study highlights problems with the pillows and mattress pads that college students take to school with them.  But, gross fungi aside, it also brings up a very important point — a good night’s sleep increases a student’s chance of success in college exponentially.

Multiple studies have been done on the subject.  One, covered here at SleepBetter.org, looked at 60 college-age subjects.  The participants were split into two equal groups.  In the morning, the first group learned a batch of 30 fake words.  They then returned later in the evening to take a test on how well they learned the words. Meanwhile, the second group studied the same phony words at nighttime. This group did not complete their vocabulary test until the following morning after a full night’s sleep.

Once the tests were scored, researchers found that the subjects who slept after learning the new words performed much better than those who were awake throughout the day.

By entering a deep sleep, your brain is better able to establish connections between new facts and previous knowledge.  Since learning new things and applying connections is what college is all about, it only stands to reason that sleep and attending college should go together like two peas in a pod.

Here are some recommendations from an article we published last year called Five Tips to Help College Students Sleep Better:

  • Make sure they have a proper pillow.  Check out that pillow your student is taking to school.  Has it been around since they were in kindergarten?  If so, replace it.  Not only could it be filled with fungi, an outdated, out-of-shape pillow can also make it hard to get comfortable at night.
  • Add a mattress pad. Dormitory beds are notoriously uncomfortable, but adding a good mattress pad can make them tolerable.
  • Earplugs may not be a bad idea.  It’s no secret that dorms are noisy.
  • Talk about what a bed is used for.  This will sound strange, but using a bed for a desk, a TV chair, and even a video game lounge can lead to not getting to sleep when it’s bedtime.
  • Suggest a good sleep routine.  Going to bed and getting up at the same time every night is the best way to go.  Knowing that’s unrealistic, however, perhaps suggest they try to go to sleep at around the same time Sunday through Thursday.  Recognizing that Friday and Saturday night probably won’t mean lights out at 10pm, suggest trying to get to bed no later than a couple of hours after their weekday bedtime.

After reading about our college bedding story, are you freaked out about what’s inside your pillow?  Be sure to check out our article on how to clean your pillow!

http://sleepbetter.org/college-and-sleep-should-be-two-peas-in-a-pod/

Is it ADHD, or does your child have Sleep Apnea?

May 21st, 2014 Raquel Rothe

A thoughtful question posed by a doctor at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. Many of the symptoms are similar and the two illnesses are often confused.

“Not much is understood by parents about snoring or sleep apnea, especially in their children. The Stanford School of Medicine states that about 10% of children 10 years of age and younger snore and, of those children who snore, about 20% will haveobstructive sleep apnea.
Snoring can be a sign that your child has sleep apnea as it indicates, at the very least, that their airway is partially obstructed during sleep. Sleep apnea is a serious medical condition that can interrupt or stop your child’s breathing, prevent a normal night’s sleep, impair growth, and lead to a lower quality of life. It also can cause serious fatigue during the day which is why it is so often confused with ADHD.
Sleep-disordered breathing such as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have long been associated with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). You should know that not every child diagnosed with sleep apnea has ADHD, just as not every child diagnosed with ADHD has sleep apnea. However, many studies have been performed indicating a significant correlation between OSA and behavioral issues. Children with obstructive sleep apnea do not get restful sleep, and as a result may complain of morning headaches, be irritable and have difficulty concentrating.
Children with sleep apnea may complain of being tired during the day and, at the same time, exhibit hyperactive behavior or act impulsively. Herein lays the confusion of separating sleep apnea from ADHD because many of the classic symptoms of ADHD are often exhibited in children with OSA. So, as a parent of a child diagnosed with ADHD, what do you do?”

5-7-14 adhd“It will be in your child’s best interest if you dig a little deeper into the root of what may be causing these behaviors. Watch your child sleep at night – and even record it if you can. Check for restlessness, mouth breathing, snoring, or breathing pauses. If they occur, have your child evaluated for possible sleep apnea to ensure the proper diagnosis and treatment.
Figuring out if your child has sleep apnea or ADHD may seem quite complex but it doesn’t have to be. Consult with a sleep apnea doctor if you can answer ‘yes’ to any or some of the following questions:
- Does your child snore?
- Does your child stop breathing for a few seconds at night?
- Does your child frequently mouth breathe?
- Does your child sleep through the night or is it a restless sleep?
- Is there frequent bedwetting?
- Does your child seem irritable during the day? Is there difficulty focusing? Are there periods of hyperactivity?”

7-14-1`2 teacher and sleeper“The good news is that sleep apnea is treatable. Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are the most common causes of sleep apnea in children. An Ear, Nose and Throat specialist can determine if your child’s tonsils and adenoids are enlarged and possibly blocking the airway at night. A tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can successfully treat sleep apnea by removing the obstruction in the airway resulting in a complete elimination of symptoms in 80-90% of children.”

Dr. Lana B. Patitucci, D.O. is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. She is trained in all aspects of general and pediatric otolaryngology including endoscopic sinus, otologic, head and neck, and facial plastic surgery.

Review of OSA Therapy Options for Pediatric Patients

May 2nd, 2014 Raquel Rothe

April 11, 2014
by 

Sleep apnea is difficult for anyone to live with, but it is especially challenge for a young child. As a parent, it can also be quite frightening and stressful. If you have noticed that your child has sleep apnea, Take them to a physician and start treatment as soon as possible. Following are some treatment options for children with sleep apnea.

Surgery is often an option for children with severe sleep apnea.  These surgeries are to remove the tonsils or the adenoids.The surgery typically has a success rate of about 80 50 percent. In some cases, the tonsils or adenoids can actually grow back, increasing the chances of sleep apnea re-developing. Regular followup is a must for patients with sleep apnea.

Another option to consider is getting your child a CPAP to use at night. CPAP stands for a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.  Your child would need to wear a mask which is attached to a blower that will continuously blow air into your child’s nose throughout the night while he or she is sleeping. These devices are shown to maintain normal breathing patterns and keep your child safe.

Dentistry does not have a treatment modality that includes treatment for pediatric OSA with classic sleep appliances.  This is due to the quick arch and dentition changes.  Dental treatment comes in to form of orthodontic treatment that includes maxillary expansion and advancement of the mandible.  These 2 modalities require much further elaboration.  This is not the venue.

Snoring and CPAP Intolerance: Dr. Keropian is the inventor and patent holder of the Full Breath Solution sleep appliance. He has attained 5 FDA Certification and 5 Patents. Presently he has two patents pending. He the CEO of Full Breath Corporation.

He can be reached at 818-702-6002 or via email at fullbreathsolution@hotmail.com or tmjrelief@msn.com. You can also check out his website: cpapalternative.com

Should You Use the SNOOZE Button?

January 18th, 2014 Raquel Rothe

http://youtu.be/P6zcSFA7ymo

10 Unconventional (But Great) Sleeping Tips You’ve Probably Never Heard

January 10th, 2014 Raquel Rothe

By: Lifehack

Increasingly, science is showing that sleep is a basic building block for sustaining life and that sleep, like digestion, respiration and meaningful relationships, is one of the most important processes for the human body. During sleep the body heals, grows, and replenishes itself so that people can thrive with abundant, vibrant lives.

When we are children, sleep comes very naturally. The body demands it and it occurs. Children can sleep in almost any circumstance—driving in a car, with a TV on in the next room, with the dog barking. Children, teens and even young adults fall easily into sleep providing their circadian rhythm has not been disrupted. Unfortunately for adults, sleep is too often an elusive state that escapes us, causing a myriad of problems with health, happiness and productivity.

Sleep issues can arise for many different reasons, and for different reasons at different times in one’s life. Physical or emotional stress, changes in schedules and routines, dietary changes and disruptions to our natural circadian rhythm are the most common reasons that sleep problems arise. Unfortunately, when sleep problems do develop, they can become the norm rather than the exception for many people, and reversing these patterns takes some time and effort.

Next time you’re struggling with sleep, experiment with any of the following 10 unconventional but great sleeping tips to determine what will work best for you:

1. Strategize Your Day Plan

Plan your day as closely as you can so that you follow the same pattern and routine each day. Although this may sound boring, as it lacks spontaneity, when it comes to improving your sleep, your body thrives on daily rhythms and schedules. Wake up and go to sleep at the same time and try to have your meals at the same time as well. This will allow your body, hormones and other brain chemicals to function optimally, and this will allow your body to produce the hormones needed to fall and stay asleep.

2. Move Your Body Daily

Exercise has numerous benefits, and research finds new benefits every day. Regular exercise improves heart health and blood pressure, builds bone and muscle, helps combat stress and muscle tension, improves mood, and improves sleep. Exercise helps you sleep sounder and longer and feel more awake during the day.

When engaging in physical activity, it’s important that you choose activities that resonate with you and bring you happiness while participating. If you love dancing, try a Zumba class, if you like being outside, try running, cycling or skating. An additional benefit to exercising outside is exposure to sunshine. Twenty minutes per day of sunshine helps produce vitamin D, an important vitamin to your overall health and hormonal system. Also consider the time of day you are engaging in physical activity. Earlier in the day is better when it comes to sleep. Exercise excites the body and creates new energy, when you do this too close to bed time it could interfere with sleep.

3. Sleep Naked

The body naturally cools down as it produces melatonin and prepares the body for rest. Among other things, this process requires the body temperature to drop. When you sleep with heavy pajamas and blankets, the body has a difficult time lowering your temperature and this will wake you up. Try sleeping naked in good quality, comfortable sheets, and keep the temperature down in your bedroom.

4. Understand You Have a Circadian Rhythm

The body’s system and functions are based on rhythms. Humans have a circadian rhythm and a circannual rhythm. These rhythms control many things. The circadian rhythm—our daily time clock—is particularly important when it comes to sleep. Hormones provide signals to the body all day and all night long that control sleep and eating patterns. For this rhythm to function optimally, there are environmental components we can control to support this important process. When your sleep is compromised by work or stress, for example, you will lose this rhythm and re-establishing it can be difficult.

5. Turn Off Your Screens

Your circadian rhythm is strongly signaled by light. The bright light of the morning produces certain hormones and signals and the darkness of the evening and night produce others. The access to 24-hour lighting has largely influenced our exposure to light and therefore our daily rhythms. The one key thing you can do is limit your exposure to light in the evening, particularly the light emitted by TVs and computers. The light produced by these devices significantly interferes with the production of melatonin, the sleep hormone produced in the pituitary gland that signals sleep to the body. It’s crucial that the amount of light the body is exposed to decreases slowly over the course of the evening. Ideally, you would turn off all screens one to two hours before you’d like to sleep.

6. Do Something Relaxing

Avoid activity that is too stimulating in the evening. The brain is wired to respond to your physical and emotional needs at any time of day. When you engage in stimulating activity such as a dramatic TV program, a heated discussion with a family member, or work-related emailing, your brain’s awareness is heightened and bringing yourself down from that will take time. Avoid that by winding down. Have a cut-off time, perhaps one to two hours before bed, in which you will not engage in anything too stimulating. Make this a daily practice and tell the people you live with that it’s a goal you have. Try something relaxing like reading a book, meditation or gentle stretching.

7. Have Sex

After a day of work, commuting and children, the last thing many people want to consider is sex. But there are many health benefits to having sex, including better sleep. Weekday sex can be a simple quickie if time and energy are concerns, and that too will provide benefit. You’ll fall asleep faster after orgasm and there’s good reason for that. The hormone prolactin is released after orgasm. Prolactin is responsible for feelings of relaxation and sleepiness. As well, following orgasm, the body produces oxytocin, the feel-good hormone that reduces stress and helps us bond with others, so the benefit extends to your relationship and your overall health.

8. Watch Your Food Intake

The body is sensitive to all of the things you do to it, expect of it and feel throughout the day. Food digestion is a key function of the body that influences many things, including sleep. Keep your consumption of caffeinated beverages, including coffee, to a minimum and consume them before 3 p.m. if possible. Caffeine is very stimulating and interferes with the hormones required to relax the body and produce sleep.

Also, consider the type of food you’re eating. Having simple carbs in the evening has a relaxing effect on many people and helps with relaxation and sleep. Keep in mind how close you’re eating to bedtime. Ideally, you should stop eating three hours before bed. Digestion requires a lot of energy and time. If the body is busy digesting your last meal, you will have problems falling and staying asleep. Give your body the break it needs during the night to heal and repair you by allowing it to be free of the job of digesting food.

9. Drink Calming Tea After A Warm Bath

Magnesium is a mineral responsible for many functions in the body. One of its most important functions is calming muscles. By adding magnesium to a warm bath with some essential oil, you will be able to relax and drift into a deep sleep. Having a cup of herbal tea in the evening is calming and when done regularly (like turning off screens, taking a bath or reading a book), functions as an important signal to the brain and body that time for rest is near, allowing the required systems to begin their work. Chamomile tea has long been thought to be a helpful sleep aid. There are many companies producing blends that help relax the body and aid with sleep.

10. Keep Your Room Dark

Even the smallest amount of light hitting the eyelid (some research says the size of a pinhole will do it) can interfere with the production of melatonin, which would result in poor quality sleep or lack of sleep. Keeping your room both dark and cool have been shown to be imperative in regulating sleep. Invest in blackout curtains to ensure that your room is dark all night. Turn off and block the light from all electronic appliances, such as clock radios and cell phones. Better yet, remove them from your bedroom if possible. If blocking out the light is problematic, purchase a soft eye-mask that you can wear comfortably throughout the night.

AASM Children’s Sleep Education Apps

October 24th, 2013 Raquel Rothe

Perfect for your waiting room or to recommend to parents, two new kid-friendly apps recently debuted on the App Store, Google Play, and Amazon markets.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) developed these mobile solutions to help children learn about the importance of sleep.

I See the Animals Sleeping: A Bedtime Story uses richly detailed illustrations to show the different sleep habits of animals around the world. The Animals Sleep: A Bedtime Book of Biomes is a watercolor illustrated journey through the diverse environments where animals sleep.

If you like the apps, write a review of the products to help others discover the apps—and the value of sleep.

7 Ways To Fall Asleep Easier As a Teen

June 7th, 2013 Raquel Rothe
Category: Health
Published on Friday, 31 May 2013 13:57
Written by Aaliya Imtiaz

Due to overburden, teenagers have difficulty in falling asleep earlier at night. For many teenagers maintaining consistency in their sleep schedules is not always easy. Not only the teenagers but also thousands of people around the world cannot fall asleep fast. Sleeping well is vital because it improves your concentration, mood and your overall health.

Doctors recommend ten to eleven hours sleep for teenagers. Do you get enough sleep to feel great and pay attention to all work all the day?

If your answer are like most teens is yes then chances are you don’t. Taking sleeping pills is not a good option to fall asleep early so what should one do? Here are 7 basic ways to fallasleep earlier that you can use to setup regular healthy sleeping habits.

1. Never go to sleep hungry.

It would not let you sleep but only disrupt your sleep. Food gives you energy and activates the stomach muscles that keep you up. If you are more hungry then don’t eat big meal. Eat light food such as snacks in three hours before you go to bed.

2. Drink warm milk before you go to bed.

Milk is a good source of amino acid tryptophan that your body converts to melatonin and serotonin. Both of these are thought to induce sleep. Cherries are also good option for a better sleep and it has proven that cherry juice improves sleep and helps out with insomnia. Cherry has melatonin and helps you regulate your body.

3. Before going to sleep avoid coffee.

Try it; you never know if that can help you every night to go to sleep. Also avoid sugar and starches before going to bed that can really help you to put you back to sleep. Consuming sugar before going to sleep causes blood sugar to drop at night and make you wake up during the night.

4. While you are going to sleep ask yourself whether you are using appropriate bedding or not?

If it is winter season choose a warm fluffy blanket that would be comfortable for you. Add super comfy pillow to have a good sleep.

5. If you want to fall asleep faster, then you have to take a bath before sleeping.

As it raises your body temperature and drops afterwards your body becomes sleepy and you can have a better sleep. If your hair is wet then it will disrupt your sleep, so blow dry your hair if possible before going to bed.

6. Sleep is basically a lowered state of consciousness.

Try to get to sleep faster by simply focusing on the darkness when you close your eyes. Don’t think about anything that crosses your mind. Think of the things that are calm and comfortable and a source of pleasure for you. If you can master this trick it will help you fall asleep in a couple of minutes.

7. Maintaining the temperature of room is also important.

Do notice if your room is too hot or too cold? 60 degree farenheit is the ideal room temperature for a good sleep. If your room is too cold or too hot then make it normal by reducing or increasing temperature accordingly.

A small change can make a big difference in the quality of your sleep. So get benefits from easy tips to have a good sleep at night.